Recent recognition by industry experts

Throughout 2023 and to start 2024, MPS Law has continued to be recognised by industry experts.

In February 2023, MPS Law Principal Michael Pagsanjan was recognised as a leading lawyer in Doyle’s Guide, with MPS Law Senior Lawyer Reade Allison recognised as a native title rising star. 

In May 2023, MPS Law Special Counsel Georgina Reid, along with Reade Allison, presented to industry experts and colleagues on “Ethical Negotiation of Indigenous Land Use Agreements” at a Legalwise conference.

In August 2023, Michael was recognised as the native title partner of the year in the Lawyers Weekly Partner of the Year Awards. Michael was also a finalist in the Pro Bono partner of the year category.

MPS Law was also a finalist for Boutique Law Firm of the Year for the 2023 Australian Law Awards. Michael was further recognised as a finalist for Managing Partner of the Year.

In December, Michael was ranked Band 1 as a Lawyer for Native Title: Traditional Owners by the Chambers Asia-Pacific Legal Guide 2024.

Also in December, Reade was shortlisted as a finalist in the Lawyers Weekly 30 under 30 awards.

In February 2024, MPS Law was recognised in Doyle’s Guide as a leading native title firm, with Michael also recogised as an industry leader. In addition, Georgina was listed as ‘recommended’, and Senior Lawyer Helen Orr was recognised as a native title rising star.

On behalf of MPS Law, Michael credits recognition to the hardworking team, supportive family and resilient clients.

2022 Year in Review: Native Title Law and Policy

Native title and other related laws continue to be complex and dynamic. This article summarises key native title claim statistics and then identifies trends from in 2022, including in relation to native title compensation and charitable trust laws. Updates to national treaty discussions are also provided. Four key native title decisions from 2022 are then explored, including a decision relating to implied Indigenous Land Use Agreement terms. Finally, recent changes to related laws in Western Australia and Northern Territory are explained.

The article is available here.

Tax considerations for a PBC

If a native title claim is successful, the native title holders must nominate an Aboriginal corporation to hold their native title. This is formally called a Registered Native Title Body Corporate (or ‘RNTBC’). It more commonly referred to as a Prescribed Body Corporate, or a PBC.

A PBC is likely to encounter tax issues in a range of matters. This factsheet identifies some possible tax issues in four commonly experienced scenarios.

Our factsheet is available here.

Template PBC Rulebook

If a native title claim is successful, the native title holders must nominate an Aboriginal corporation to hold their native title. This is formally called a Registered Native Title Body Corporate (or ‘RNTBC’). It more commonly referred to as a Prescribed Body Corporate, or a PBC. To learn more about the steps for PBC incorporation, view our video and factsheet here.

In making a PBC, native title holders can design their own Rule Book. The Rule Book sets out how the PBC will work. Some rules are set and cannot be changed. Other rules can be changed.

We have developed a Template Rule Book and Schedule Index to help native title holders understand which rules are set and which rules can be changed. The Template Rule book has a light bulb symbol for each rule that native title holders should discuss further. The Schedule Index then provides brief commentary and key questions for that rule.

Our Template Rule Book is available here and the Schedule Index is available here.